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The Eyes Have It

Disclaimer:

Information presented in the "Living With..." sections of the SCARF website represent the personal viewpoint of the individual who made the journal entry and do not represent the opinions, positions, or viewpoints of SCARF or the veterinary community. [see complete disclaimer at bottom of page]

 

I had a puppy that proved to have this disease.  She was, as all affected puppies are, born with it. The gender of puppies is not an overriding factor, but this was a bitch. The diagnosis was by a veterinarian during a routine litter screening before the litter was sold to their new homes. This particular puppy had no prominent third eyelid, just a slightly smaller eye. She had cataracts as well and was completely blind.  It appears she had been managing just by following her siblings with her other senses. She showed no signs of being blind except when put in another than usual situation.

 

So what do you do with a 7 week old puppy, to all other intents and purposes, normal?

 

The phone call from heaven arrived. ‘I have just lost a blind bitch and her sighted partner is missing her. I hear you have a blind puppy; can I have her?’

 

At the same time, this lady took on a rescue puppy. The blind puppy, having been socialized and having all the aplomb in the world, actually took the un-socialized rescue puppy in hand, showing her the best spots in the house, the way into the garden and where to go to bed!

 

The blind puppy, having confidence, likes to go for walks, preferring routes she knows.  She also goes visiting sick people. She is gentle but full of character. She is on no medication for her eyes. Twelve months on she leads a happy and fulfilled life. Having never had sight, she doesn’t seem to miss it, just compensate for it.

 

At the same time I had this bombshell, I was asked to visit a fellow breeder with a litter who had a puppy with one affected eye. So it seems the disease can affect one eye. This puppy leads a normal life and has no problems with both eyes functioning, if differing sizes.

 

Photos of both of these puppies now show them to look perfectly normal from a distance.

6/30/2010 Update

'As the dog gets older, the eyelids may start to turn in as there is not much eyeball filling the socket. This will result in entropian which can be corrected by the relevant veterinary operation.'
 
I know this as the bitch I bred has just had to have her eyelids resectioned--she is now 5 years old!

 

 

 


Disclaimer:

Information presented in the "Living With..." sections of the SCARF website represent the personal viewpoint of the individual who made the journal entry and do not represent the opinions, positions, or viewpoints of SCARF or the veterinary community.  There may be discussions of drugs, devices, additives, foods, vitamins, herbs or biologicals that have not been approved by the FDA/CVM for the particular use being discussed.    SCARF assumes no liability for the accuracy or outcomes of any suggestions, advice or other information provided by the "Living With..." postings on the SCARF website.  All treatment decisions should only be made after discussion with your pet's veterinary health professional, and no changes in your pet's treatments or diet should be made based on any information found on the SCARF website.

 

 
Notable Quotations

"If your dog thinks you're the greatest person in the world, don't seek a second opinion." -Jim Fiebig


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